The 2017 Olympia Book Fair is now closed.

We are excited to announce that in 2018 the Fair is relocating
to Battersea Evolution, 24-26 May 2018.
Carleton House
92 Malone Road
Belfast
BT9 5HP
Contact Peter Rowan
Telephone 02890 666448
Specialists Ireland, Irish History & Culture, Manuscripts, Maps, Literature, Economics, Sciences, History of Ideas, Travel, Rare Books in all fields (15th to 20th Centuries)
VIEW DEALER INFORMATION
Carleton House
92 Malone Road
Belfast
BT9 5HP
Contact Peter Rowan
Telephone 02890 666448
Specialists Ireland, Irish History & Culture, Manuscripts, Maps, Literature, Economics, Sciences, History of Ideas, Travel, Rare Books in all fields (15th to 20th Centuries)
P & B Rowan
Stand F02

CIRCA 500 ORIGINAL DRAWINGS OF AN IMPORTANT ENGLISH GOTHIC ARCHITECT

BURY, Thomas Talbot

Collection of circa 500 Original Drawings in two Albums comprising sketches of mainly Gothic architecture, interiors, details, ornaments, furniture and fittings etc., [London] c.1840 - 1856

2 quarto albums (31 x 25 cm. and 36 x 28.2cms.) with 57 and 88 leaves respectively, containing circa 500 paste-in original sketches in pencil or ink (a few include colour) ranging in size from full-page to 7 x 9 cms. (but most of an intermediate size) on various types of paper (including tracing paper), most sketches are titled and/or annotated and some are dated and a significant a number are signed or initialled by Bury, some of the pasted-in pieces with multiple sketches, both albums are bound in contemporary half leather with marbled boards,the first volume now neatly rebacked and the second has had a new front board supplied (to replace the missing original) and then neatly rebacked. Generally very good.

Provenance
The front endpaper of the first album inscribed "Sketches by/ Talbot Bury./ 1852" and with the armorial bookplates of Lord Ardilaun and Benjamin John Plunket.

Note
Bury (bap. 1809 - 1877), English architect, architectural writer, artist and engraver, "in 1824 he was articled to Augustus Charles Pugin, and in 1830 he commenced practice at 7 Gerrard Street, Soho. He was in partnership with Charles Lee (1803/4–1880) from 1845 for about four years. He was also assistant to Louis Vulliamy. In addition to his architectural practice, Bury was often engaged in engraving and lithographing his own and other architects' drawings, notably those of Augustus Welby Pugin and Owen Jones. With the former he worked on designing the details of the houses of parliament under Sir Charles Barry. He was particularly skilful in colouring architectural studies, and his aid in this respect was often sought by the most eminent architects of the day when they were engaged in preparing designs for competition. ... He frequently exhibited his works at the Royal Academy between 1846 and 1872; and sent to the international exhibition of 1862 a large picture representing, at one view, all the churches, schools, public and other buildings erected by him (now in the R.I.B.A. collection). Among his principal works were thirty-five churches and chapels, fifteen parsonages, twelve schools, and twenty other large public buildings and private residences in various parts of England and Wales. These are listed in Bury's obituary (The Builder, 205). Bury was elected an associate of the Institute of British Architects in 1839, and a fellow in 1843. In 1876 he was elected a vice-president. He was in 1863 made a fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, and was also a member of the council of the Royal Archaeological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, a member of the Cambrian Archaeological Association, and an associate of the Society of Civil Engineers. .... His Coloured Views of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, published by Rudolph Ackermann in 1831 ... are considered to be the finest of the various series of prints published to commemorate the opening of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway ... His collections of architectural and antiquarian books, his pictures, drawings, cabinets, and armour, were sold at Christies on 29 June 1877. In 1847 Bury published Remains of Ecclesiastical Woodwork, illustrated by his own engravings [and several later books]" [O.D.N.B.].
Contains a section of 'Sketches taken at the Great Exhibition 1851 - from the Indian Collection' which includes detailed designs of textiles, needlework, decorative marble work, pottery, carpets, wood carving, furniture etc. and including one inscribed "Mr. Talbot Bury is authorised to draw in the Indian Department. F. T. Boyle". There are numerous sketches of metal-work, wood-work, stone carvings, architectural details both exterior and interior including tombstones, chimney pieces, doorways, toilets, wall-panelling, altars, ceilings, corbels, porches, mullions,arches, initials, carvings from both private and public building in both Europe and England and most have captions giving the place and many are dated and signed. Some of the detailed interior architectural drawing include measurements or give the scale. Many of the sketches are presumably for places designed by Bury. There are some interior sketches for Liveden Manor House and Farming Woods, including one full-page sketch of a very elaborate chimney piece entitled "Chimney piece in Dining Hall for the Rt. Honbl. Vernon Smith Apr. ---/ 1844". This page is inscribed "this one" in the margin so presumably this is the design for what was actually built. Also included is a full-page outline sketch of the same chimney piece entitled "The Rt. Hon. R. Vernon Smith Dining Halls" and signed "T. Bury" and a full-page sketch of a very elaborate and intricately carved massive console table entitled "The Rt. Honble. R. Vernon Smith/ Dining Hall/ Farming Woods" and "Cornice of panels ---/ ----?/ dining Hall Farming Woods. T. Bury/ May 1844". Robert Vernon Smith, Lord Lyveden, (1800-1873), Liberal politician, acquired the Farming Woods estate in 1841 and made additions to Farming Woods Hall thereafter. Presumably these are the sketches for the additions.
Benjamin John Plunket (1870-1947), an Anglican bishop and son of Ann Lee Guinness (sister of Lord Ardilaun) was left the St. Anne's Park estate in Rahney, Co. Dublin, formerly the residence of his uncle Lord Ardilaun, following the death of Lady Ardilaun, in 1937. He later sold the estate to Dublin Corporation but retained some of the property which has in recent times been sold by his descendants.
Arthur Edward Guinness, 1st Baron Ardilaun (1840–1915), Irish businessman, politician, and philanthropist, is best known for giving St Stephen's Green to the people of Dublin. His father Benjamin Lee Guinness (1798 – 1868), Irish brewer, philanthropist and the richest man in Ireland, "from 1860 to 1865, .. undertook at his own expense, and without hiring an architect, the restoration of the city's St Patrick's Cathedral, an enterprise that cost him over £150,000" [Wikipedia]. There is in the Royal Irish Academy "a folio of [Bury's] plans and drawings for the proposed restoration of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin, dated 1847" [Irish Architectural Archive] so it may be that this collection of Bury's drawings entered the Guinness family at around that time, or Lord Ardilaun could have purchased them at the 1877 auction. The R.I.B.A. have a few of his drawings in their collection.

Signed / Inscribed
Signed & Inscribed
£5,500