Flaesketorvet 68
1711 Koebenhavn V
Denmark
Contact Christian Westergaard
Nils Lundvang
Telephone +45 2762 8014
+45 2075 1233
Fax +45 6991 8469
Specialists Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Medicine, Anatomy, Astronomy, General Science.
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Flaesketorvet 68
1711 Koebenhavn V
Denmark
Contact Christian Westergaard
Nils Lundvang
Telephone +45 2762 8014
+45 2075 1233
Fax +45 6991 8469
Specialists Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Medicine, Anatomy, Astronomy, General Science.
The item listed here are samples from the 2016 fair.
We will be launching the highlights of the 2017 fair on 1st May 2017.
Sophia Rare Books
Stand

One of the earliest works with anatomical illustrations

HUNDT, Magnus

Antropologium de hominis dignitate, natura et proprietatibus, de elementis, partibus et membris humani corporis, Leipzig: Wolfgang Stöckel 1501

First edition, an outstanding copy in an untouched contemporary binding from the collection of Jean Blondelet, of one of the earliest works with anatomical illustrations, which “includes the first illustrations of the viscera in a printed book” (GM). This is a very rare book on the market: ABPC/RBH lists just the Norman copy, Christie’s 1998 $85,000 modern binding; Swann Galleries 1979 $8,600 modern binding; Sotheby’s 1974 $6,000 disbound. “The Antropologium … contains four large and several small woodcuts, which are accepted among the earliest of anatomical illustrations that are a little more than schematic representation. His work contains illustrations of the internal organs but without images of bones or muscles and this work seems to be the most comprehensive representation of all the internal parts up to that time. One of those illustrations shows the trachea on the right side of the neck, passing downward to the lungs; on the left side the oesophagus is represented. In the thorax are seen the lungs and the heart. The pericardium has been opened and the stomach and intestines are figured crudely. In addition, a figure of the uterus depicting the anatomy of the uterus with seven cells (Figura matricis) is noted. These illustrations also give a clear idea of pre-Berengarian anatomy and seem to be the aggregate of the views entertained in the fifteenth century as to the position and shape of the anatomic parts” (Gurunluoglu et al, ‘The history and illustration of anatomy in the Middle Ages,’ Journal of Medical Biography 21 (2013), 219-229).
❧Norman 1115; Garrison-Morton 363.3; Stillwell 664; Flamm 15; Choulant-Frank pp. 125-126; Wellcome 3362a (lacking last 4ff).