The 2017 Olympia Book Fair is now closed.

We are excited to announce that in 2018 the Fair is relocating
to Battersea Evolution, 24-26 May 2018.
100 Fulham Road
Chelsea
London
SW3 6HS
Contact Pom Harrington, Ian Smith
Telephone 020 7591 0220
Fax 020 7225 7054
Specialists Literature, Science, Philosophy, History of Ideas, Travel, Voyages, Atlases, 20th C Literature, Photography, Natural History, Colour Plate, Children's Illustrated Books, Children's Books, Fine Bindings, Bound Sets, Original Artwork, Military, Economics
VIEW DEALER INFORMATION
100 Fulham Road
Chelsea
London
SW3 6HS
Contact Pom Harrington, Ian Smith
Telephone 020 7591 0220
Fax 020 7225 7054
Specialists Literature, Science, Philosophy, History of Ideas, Travel, Voyages, Atlases, 20th C Literature, Photography, Natural History, Colour Plate, Children's Illustrated Books, Children's Books, Fine Bindings, Bound Sets, Original Artwork, Military, Economics
Peter Harrington
Stand H08

OWEN, Robert.

A New View of Society: or, Essays on the Principle, London: Printed for Cadell and Davies by Richard T

4 parts bound in one octavo volume (230 x 142 mm). Contemporary straight-grained dark blue morocco, spine decorated and lettered gilt in compartments, gilt roll borders, inner dentelles and edges, watered pink silk doublures and endpapers.

A New View of Society is “Owen’s first and most important published work, containing the principles upon which he based his educational and social reforms at New Lanark, an account of their application there, and an outline of the means by which his theories might be applied to the nation as a whole. The first Essay … [dedicated to Wilberforce] was written in 1812 and published [anonymously], after it had been submitted to Francis Place for revision ... The second Essay was published in the same year, the third and fourth were privately printed and circulated during 1814, not being published until two years later” (Goldsmiths’ Owen Exhibition).
The work states clearly Owen’s view of social development, stressing his egalitarian educational doctrine. At the New Lanark industrial settlement Owen erected a large new building, the ‘Institute for the Formation of Character’, which was to contain public halls, community rooms and above all schools for the children at work in the factory, and with a nursery school (what Owen called a ‘playground’). The educational work at New Lanark for many years excited the admiration of visitors from all over the world. The ‘Fourth Essay’ of the book contains proposals at national level, including a universal state educational system, a Ministry of Education, colleges for training teachers, a system of state-aided public works, and the gradual abolition of the poor laws.
A two-page manuscript note to the additional front free endpaper, together with a further five pages bound in at the end of the volume, signed by J. W. Ford, states that this copy was originally given by Robert Owen to William Allen, one of his business partners from 1814 in his third ownership of New Lanark. 1814. Allen (1770-1843), a philanthropist and scientist, purchased the New Lanark mills from Owen’s previous partners, together with Owen, Jeremy Bentham, John Walker and three others, “in order to establish a model industrial community” (ODNB). The copy was subsequently in the library of John Walker, the largest shareholder after Owen in New Lanark, giving his family the largest financial stake and making the Walkers ultimate heirs to New Lanark. Laid in is an autograph letter from Robert Owen to General Lafayette, written from John Walker’s house in Bedford Square, London, some time after Walker’s death in May 1824, requesting help for Walker’s widowed sister and her niece during their travels abroad:
“My Dear General,
Permit me to introduce to your kind notice Mrs & Miss Lewis the widowed sister & the niece of the late John Walker F.R.S. of London last known upon the Continent for his love for, & knowledge of, the arts & sciences & for the extraordinary urbanity of his life & manners.
Should any occasion arise in the present agitated state of men’s minds when these ladies might require advice or protection in a strange land I am sure you will extend yours to Mrs & Miss Lewis
[2] as you have always done to those who required them on this as well as upon the other side of the Atlantic.
Knowing how many letters you must now receive I will merely add that I remain Most Respecetd Sir, your sincere friend Robert Owen.”
£87,500